Journée de la diplomatie climatique du 17 juin

Equipe interministérielle climat

Journée de la diplomatie climatique du 17 juin
Eléments de langage généraux (Anglais)

• Following the success of the first edition last September, we are delighted to join our British, German and European Union [and other] colleagues for this event, and to associate French Embassies with the Climate Diplomacy Day in nearly 60 countries.
• Throughout the world, diplomats, citizens, scientists, artists, policy-makers… are gathering to raise awareness and send, through numerous ways, a clear and common message: climate change knows no borders.
• Today, we are showing that, not only everybody must act, but that positive actions are already being taken on the ground, to shape together a low-carbon future. This diversity of national situations is a strength, and we must build on it to address the climate challenge, which is, by definition, one of the most global issues.
• We are halfway through a year, 2015, during which the focus is on development and climate. These battles can only be won if fought together: to tackle poverty and enable development, we must win the battle against climate change.
• To do so, we need to build together an agreement in Paris that enables us to limit the planet’s average temperature rise to less than 2ºC or 1.5ºC above pre-industrial levels and adapt our societies to deal with the existing climate disruption.
• It should set us on the path of a low-carbon transition which will allow everyone to benefit from sustainable development. This transition will - above all – be an opportunity: to improve energy security, bring down the deficit, reduce poverty, improve public health...
• In our capacity as future presidency, and as the mobilisation throughout our diplomatic network shows today, we are working with all countries, transparently, to support the negotiating process towards an agreement everyone will be able to own. The many discussions we are having confirm that all countries want to achieve a universal agreement on the climate in December 2015.
• As incoming presidency of the COP21, we are not supporting one specific solution, neither a French or a European one. We are listening equally to all parties, in order to understand the concerns, the national situations and the expectations for each and every one of them, particularly the most vulnerable.
• We envision we should achieve, in December, a Paris Alliance for Climate, that should rely on four components:
o The first, and most important one, is a universal and legally binding agreement. This agreement will have to equally concern mitigation and adaptation, a priority for all countries which are already feeling the impact of climate disruption, sometimes in a tragic way. The agreement will also have to take into account everyone’s responsibilities and capabilities. It will have to be long-term and establish a process of cooperation between us, so that we can reinforce our collective effort and progressively achieve a shared long-term goal.
o National contributions (INDCs) that each country must publish before the Paris Conference. These contributions must present commitments on mitigating greenhouse gas emissions, and for those willing to do so, include adaptation plans. Nearly 40 countries have already presented them. The European Union is playing its part. We have - together with Germany, the United Kingdom, and many others, supported last year’s the adoption of ambitious European climate and energy objectives for 2030, among which the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions by at least 40% compared to 1990. These constitute the European ‘iNDC’ to the Paris Agreement.
o To enable a global transition, we must also address financing. We must create confidence that the commitment made in Copenhagen in 2009 to mobilize $100 billion a year by 2020 for developing countries (some of which will go through the Green Climate Fund) will indeed be honoured. More broadly, we must establish the rules and incentives to enable a profound redirection of public and private capital flows towards the low-carbon economy.
o Finally, the fourth aspect of the Paris Alliance is the Lima-Paris Action Agenda, which aims to involve civil society and non-state actors (local authorities, businesses and voluntary organizations) to commit and strengthen the engagement of states, so as to reinforce our collective effort, particularly before 2020. Today is an opportunity to showcase many concrete actions and illustrate the cooperation between governments and non-state actors. It shall also convey the message, right through to the Paris Conference, that the climate challenge represents economic and social opportunities, and that all civil society actors should get on board.

• In all these areas, progress is being made: contributions are being published, financial actors are getting increasingly active, and each day we get closer to the agreement that we need in Paris.
• As such, the session of intermediate negotiations that just took place in Bonn reinforce the trust of parties in the process and gave a mandate to the two co-chairs of the ADP working group to restructure the current project and present a more concise and clearer text, which will then be negotiated in the next two intermediate negotiation sessions (August and October), so that in Paris.
• We are entering a period where we need to do everything possible to identify and consolidate the areas of convergence on the key political questions. To help finding these compromises, we will support the formal negotiation process by organizing over the coming months (July, September and October) several informal discussions, on both negotiator and ministerial level. These meetings will gather countries which are representative of the negotiation groups, but will always be open to everyone who wants to participate, and the results will then be reported back to the ADP working group.
• We also envisage consulting heads of state and government, so that they can give clear political direction. With this in mind, we are considering a meeting in New York in September, during the United Nations General Assembly, lead by the French President and the United Nations Secretary-General. Furthermore, we are envisaging that heads of state and government who wish to attend the opening of COP21, may do so.
• As reminded by President Hollande at the G7 summit last week – where developed countries adopted an ambitious position in view of COP21, France is facing up to the responsibility of its future presidency with a determination to succeed and a commitment at the state’s highest level.
• As we speak today [heure de l’évènement à Paris : 16h15-17h], ambassadors from all across Europe in Paris will bike towards the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs to show Minister and upcoming President of the COP21 Laurent Fabius support in preparing the COP21.
• With just 5 months to go until the conference, we believe that we are on the right track, but time is short and the pace of the negotiations must be stepped up. Every meeting must represent a step forward, and everyone must agree to make the necessary choices in a spirit of mutual trust, so that in October all the issues will already have been discussed and solutions can be proposed. The Paris agreement must be built before Paris.


Journée de la diplomatie climatique du 17 juin

Eléments de langage généraux (Anglais)

• Following the success of the first edition last September, we are delighted to join our British, German and European Union [and other] colleagues for this event, and to associate French Embassies with the Climate Diplomacy Day in nearly 60 countries.
• Throughout the world, diplomats, citizens, scientists, artists, policy-makers… are gathering to raise awareness and send, through numerous ways, a clear and common message: climate change knows no borders.
• Today, we are showing that, not only everybody must act, but that positive actions are already being taken on the ground, to shape together a low-carbon future. This diversity of national situations is a strength, and we must build on it to address the climate challenge, which is, by definition, one of the most global issues.
• We are halfway through a year, 2015, during which the focus is on development and climate. These battles can only be won if fought together: to tackle poverty and enable development, we must win the battle against climate change.
• To do so, we need to build together an agreement in Paris that enables us to limit the planet’s average temperature rise to less than 2ºC or 1.5ºC above pre-industrial levels and adapt our societies to deal with the existing climate disruption.
• It should set us on the path of a low-carbon transition which will allow everyone to benefit from sustainable development. This transition will - above all – be an opportunity: to improve energy security, bring down the deficit, reduce poverty, improve public health...
• In our capacity as future presidency, and as the mobilisation throughout our diplomatic network shows today, we are working with all countries, transparently, to support the negotiating process towards an agreement everyone will be able to own. The many discussions we are having confirm that all countries want to achieve a universal agreement on the climate in December 2015.
• As incoming presidency of the COP21, we are not supporting one specific solution, neither a French or a European one. We are listening equally to all parties, in order to understand the concerns, the national situations and the expectations for each and every one of them, particularly the most vulnerable.
• We envision we should achieve, in December, a Paris Alliance for Climate, that should rely on four components:
o The first, and most important one, is a universal and legally binding agreement. This agreement will have to equally concern mitigation and adaptation, a priority for all countries which are already feeling the impact of climate disruption, sometimes in a tragic way. The agreement will also have to take into account everyone’s responsibilities and capabilities. It will have to be long-term and establish a process of cooperation between us, so that we can reinforce our collective effort and progressively achieve a shared long-term goal.
o National contributions (INDCs) that each country must publish before the Paris Conference. These contributions must present commitments on mitigating greenhouse gas emissions, and for those willing to do so, include adaptation plans. Nearly 40 countries have already presented them. The European Union is playing its part. We have - together with Germany, the United Kingdom, and many others, supported last year’s the adoption of ambitious European climate and energy objectives for 2030, among which the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions by at least 40% compared to 1990. These constitute the European ‘iNDC’ to the Paris Agreement.
o To enable a global transition, we must also address financing. We must create confidence that the commitment made in Copenhagen in 2009 to mobilize $100 billion a year by 2020 for developing countries (some of which will go through the Green Climate Fund) will indeed be honoured. More broadly, we must establish the rules and incentives to enable a profound redirection of public and private capital flows towards the low-carbon economy.
o Finally, the fourth aspect of the Paris Alliance is the Lima-Paris Action Agenda, which aims to involve civil society and non-state actors (local authorities, businesses and voluntary organizations) to commit and strengthen the engagement of states, so as to reinforce our collective effort, particularly before 2020. Today is an opportunity to showcase many concrete actions and illustrate the cooperation between governments and non-state actors. It shall also convey the message, right through to the Paris Conference, that the climate challenge represents economic and social opportunities, and that all civil society actors should get on board.

• In all these areas, progress is being made: contributions are being published, financial actors are getting increasingly active, and each day we get closer to the agreement that we need in Paris.
• As such, the session of intermediate negotiations that just took place in Bonn reinforce the trust of parties in the process and gave a mandate to the two co-chairs of the ADP working group to restructure the current project and present a more concise and clearer text, which will then be negotiated in the next two intermediate negotiation sessions (August and October), so that in Paris.
• We are entering a period where we need to do everything possible to identify and consolidate the areas of convergence on the key political questions. To help finding these compromises, we will support the formal negotiation process by organizing over the coming months (July, September and October) several informal discussions, on both negotiator and ministerial level. These meetings will gather countries which are representative of the negotiation groups, but will always be open to everyone who wants to participate, and the results will then be reported back to the ADP working group.
• We also envisage consulting heads of state and government, so that they can give clear political direction. With this in mind, we are considering a meeting in New York in September, during the United Nations General Assembly, lead by the French President and the United Nations Secretary-General. Furthermore, we are envisaging that heads of state and government who wish to attend the opening of COP21, may do so.
• As reminded by President Hollande at the G7 summit last week – where developed countries adopted an ambitious position in view of COP21, France is facing up to the responsibility of its future presidency with a determination to succeed and a commitment at the state’s highest level.
• As we speak today [heure de l’évènement à Paris : 16h15-17h], ambassadors from all across Europe in Paris will bike towards the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs to show Minister and upcoming President of the COP21 Laurent Fabius support in preparing the COP21.
• With just 5 months to go until the conference, we believe that we are on the right track, but time is short and the pace of the negotiations must be stepped up. Every meeting must represent a step forward, and everyone must agree to make the necessary choices in a spirit of mutual trust, so that in October all the issues will already have been discussed and solutions can be proposed. The Paris agreement must be built before Paris.

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Journée de la diplomatie climatique du 17 juin
(PDF - 359.7 kb)

Published on 17/06/2015

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